Symposium Spotlight: Jason Setchen

By: Nathaniel Reiff

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On February 28, 2020, the Wake Forest Journal of  Business & Intellectual Property will have the privilege of hosting attorney Jason Setchen as a speaker at its Spring Symposium: “Amateur Hour is Over: Analyzing the Impact Changes in ‘Amateurism’ May Have on the Business of Collegiate Sports.” Mr. Setchen will be part of a panel alongside Wigdor LLP partner Michael Willemin, to analyze whether a pay-for-play model is legally practical if college athletes were to be considered university employees. The panel will be moderated by associate Michael Grace of Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP.

Mr. Setchen is currently the managing partner of Jason A. Setchen, P.A. based in Miami, Florida. Among other practice areas, Mr. Setchen works with high school and college athletes to overcome their personal disputes with colleges and universities, the NCAA and the FHSAA. Specifically, Mr. Setchen has consulted his clients on matters pertaining to “team suspension and dismissal, administrative appeals, drug testing appeals, transfer disputes, scholarship reduction and withdrawals.” Mr. Setchen also entertains NCAA waiver cases in relation to student-athlete eligibility issues.

Mr. Setchen’s experience encompasses representation in multiple high profile matters.  For instance, he served as former Lousiville basketball recruit’s Brian Bowen attorney in his RICO lawsuit against sportswear giant Adidas and helped reinstate the former University of Miami  basketball star DeQuan Jones after the small forward was implicated for his role in the Nevin Shapiro scandal.

Mr. Setchen’s personal education features a B.A. in Criminal Justice from the University of Miami and a J.D. from the University of Miami School of Law. During his freshman year at UM, Mr. Setchen played as a walk-on for the Hurricane football team. He credits this experience for inspiring him to venture into student-athlete advocacy.

As an attendee, I expect Mr. Setchen to incorporate much of his professional experience into his commentary and perspectives. As states such as Florida begin to entertain legislation pertaining to student-athlete compensation, I also expect Mr. Setchen to discuss the potential legal impediments student-athletes, the NCAA, and the courts will have to overcome and whether defining athletes as “employees” of their respective school would be a viable solution if such compensation is mandated.

For more information about Mr. Setchen and his accomplishments, please click here.

Nathaniel Reiff is a third-year law student at Wake Forest University School of Law. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration and a Master of International Business from the University of Florida. Upon graduation, he intends to practice corporate and other aspects of contract law.