Looking to the Future of Cryptocurrency: Long-Term Tenant or Fad Trend?

 

By: Kathryn Overby

With the emergence of Bitcoin in 2009 and its rapid growth over the last year, supporters and skeptics of cryptocurrency are asking one main question: What is the future of crypto? Continue reading »

Are Humans Ready? Is the Law Equipped to Handle Artificial Intelligence?

By: Ben Suslavich

In 2015, DeepMind, owned by Alphabet, developed Artificial Intelligence (“AI”) AlphaGo to beat the reigning three-time European Champion, Fan Hui, in the board game “Go.” This victory marked a milestone in the development of AI because of the complexity of the game. Continue reading »

Informed NIL Deals: Basic Contract Law Education Should be Required for All College Athletes

By: Jacob Parrott

The world of college athletics changed forever on July 1, 2021. That day, new rules went into effect allowing college athletes to monetize their name, image, and likeness (“NIL”). Many would agree this change was long overdue. Continue reading »

Get Your Chip Together: The Role of Patent Protection in the Global Chip Shortage

By: Ryan Mahabir

Have you noticed a shortage of Ford and Toyota vehicles? Have you had trouble finding a new washing machine? Are you wondering if you will ever get your hands on a PlayStation 5? You are likely not alone in having these thoughts. All of the aforementioned products require semiconductor chips for their electrical components to function properly and to “provide a variety of functions ranging from computing to storage and memory.” Continue reading »

Preventing Trademark Infringement or Stifling Healthy Competition? A Look at 1-800 Contacts and its Keyword Advertising Battle

By: Michaela Cappucci 

Do keyword search terms promote or stifle healthy competition? It is difficult to remember a time when keyword advertising did not dominate the internet. Most search engines, such as Google, Bing, and Yahoo, maintain keyword advertising programs which allow advertisers to bid on search terms and keywords that drive customers searching for a particular product or service to their website. Continue reading »

Olympics’ Copyright Issue Highlights the IOC’s Outdated IP Licensing Approach

By: Seth Elizondo

As the 2020 Tokyo Olympics concluded for the summer, a new copyright issue came to the forefront of entertainment law. Félix “xQc” Lengyel, one of the most popular content creators on the livestreaming platform Twitch, received a copyright strike under the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act (“DMCA”). Continue reading »

Work From Home is Here to Stay: The Lasting Effects of COVID-19’s “Stay Home” Order

By: Claire Thompson

Working from home will continue to be the norm for the foreseeable future, not only because of the ever-changing COVID-19 pandemic but also because of employee preference. While employees had already been increasingly demanding remote work, the global pandemic turned that request into a requirement. Continue reading »

“TRIP-ing” Backward: Why a Waiver of IP Protections Will Not Help in the Fight Against COVID-19

By: Benjamin Suslavich

One year ago, the Wake Forest Journal of Business & Intellectual Property Law addressed the prospect of compulsory licensing under the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (“TRIPS Agreement“). The TRIPS Agreement is an international treaty that came into effect in 1995 and sets out minimum standards of intellectual property (“IP”) protection each signatory country must uphold. Continue reading »

The Safety of an Employee’s Personal Information: A Look at Data Privacy Concerns

By: Lashania White

Data privacy concerns have undoubtedly spiked during the pandemic due to new categories of identifiable personal data being collected from employees. Given this rise in accumulated personal information, data privacy law has the potential to be implicated, owing to the collection and disclosure of employees’ confidential personal information. Continue reading »

Patents & Politics Don’t Mix: Why the Supreme Court’s Decision in Arthrex Fails to Fix an Underlying Problem

By: Benjamin Suslavich

In a split 5-4 decision in Arthrex Inc. v. Smith & Nephew, Inc, the Supreme Court determined that the structure of Administrative Patent Judge (“APJs”) appointments—or lack thereof—was unconstitutional and took it upon itself to restructure the Patent Office’s chain of command. This case is another example of the Court striving to preserve the inter partes review (IPR) system, which allows anyone to file a petition requesting that the Patent Office cancel another’s patent. Continue reading »