Business

Cher Knows You Can Copyright This Font, But Not This Typeface

By: Brandy Nickoloff*| Staff Writer

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Moshik Nadav designer behind Moshik Nadav Typography brought suit against Cher in the Southern District of New York for unauthorized use of his “Paris Logo”. Nadav claimed that Cher, her label Warner Bros. Records and other defendants copied the artistic elements of the logo for Cher’s 2013 album Closer to the Truth.

Nadav has a passion for design and sees typography as a distilled form of design. He has described his work as typography that composes high-end, lush typefaces that perfectly suit any premium design. The Moshik Navdav website displays Nadav’s different typefaces which include Lingerie, Paris, and Paris Pro, among others. Visitors of the website are able to purchase the fonts for use through different types of licensing structures. The right to use the fonts is given directly through the website with the terms of use policy acting as a “binding legal agreement” between the Nadav LLC and the web user. Nowhere on the site is there any symbol or language amounting to a federal copyright.

U.S. copyright laws protect “original works of authorship” in categories such as writings, art work, and music. The copyright gives the owner the right to control the way his work is used by others. A copyright exists from the moment that an original work is created. Registration of the copyright is not required for protection, but is recommended because it creates a public record of the copyright, can create eligibility for statutory damages and attorney’s fees in successful litigation, and, if an infringement happens within the first five years of publication, it could be considered evidence of a prima facie case in court.

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New York State is Setting a New Precedent on Financial Cybersecurity Regulation

By: Thomas Gaffney*| Staff Writer

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On March 1, 2017, Maria Vullo, Superintendent of Financial Services for the Department of Financial Services in the state of New York, promulgated Part 500 of Title 23 of the Official Compilation of Codes, Rules and Regulations of the State of New York, into law. This new regulation is more commonly referred to as the controversial NY state financial cybersecurity rule. Many financial institutions fought this rule vigorously because they view the bill as unprecedented, overly restrictive, and extremely costly for compliance.

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Coachella Sues Urban Outfitters for Trademark Infringement

By: Maria Pigna*| Staff Writer 

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Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, commonly known as Coachella, is a three-day event known for its musical performances of top artists, delicious food, world-class art, and its celebrated commitment to sustainability. Aside from the global attention this event receives every year, it has given itself another reason to make headlines. Coachella filed a trademark lawsuit against Urban Outfitters in the U.S. Central District Court of California on March 14, 2017.

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Can American Companies be Great Without Immigrants?

By: Cara Van Dorn*| Staff Writer

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Trump’s recent address to Congress highlighted his pride in America’s status as the land of innovation and progress.  However, very few of the innovations that America proudly claims would have been possible without immigrants: Forty percent of Fortune 500 companies have founders that are immigrants or the children of immigrants; 30% of American-based Nobel laureates were born outside of America; Immigrants founded 24% of US engineering and technology start-ups, 43% of start-ups based in Silicon Valley, and 20% of the Inc. 500 companies.  Additionally, immigrants contributed to 60% of patent filings from innovative companies and authored more than 40% of the international patent applications filed by the US government.

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Lexmark: A Closer Look at the Patent Exhaustion Doctrine when Articles are Sold Outside the U.S.

By: Katherine Escalante*| Staff Writer

https://pixabay.com/en/printer-ink-toner-technology-print-933098/On March 21, 2017, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Lexmark International, Inc. v. Impression Products, Inc. relating to the doctrine of patent exhaustion. While the opinion is not yet available, the Supreme Court’s decision is expected to become a pivotal decision on the application of the patent exhaustion doctrine. The Supreme Court will review the Federal Circuit’s en banc decision finding: “(1) the first sale doctrine does not apply to patented articles sold subject to restrictions . . .; and (2) the first sale doctrine does not apply to patented articles sold outside of the United States.”

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Fiat Chrysler Admitting to Emitting?

By: Brandy Nickoloff*| Staff Writer

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By Stratos L – https://www.flickr.com/photos/10547107@N03/13872046044/, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=32193570

On January 12th, 2017, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) issued a notice of violation to Fiat Chrysler Automobiles N.V. and FCA US LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary thereof, for alleged violations of the Clean Air Act (“CAA”). The EPA claim asserts that the light-duty models year 2014, 2015, and 2016 Jeep Grand Cherokees and Dodge Ram 1500 trucks with 3.0 liter diesel engines are equipped with engine management software that was undisclosed to the EPA. The secretly installed software allowed more than 100,000 of Fiat Chrysler’s diesel vehicles to emit pollutants above legal levels. Continue reading »

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Files Suit against Navient in Preparation for Legal Showdown with Trump Administration

By: Jacky Brammer*| Staff Writer 

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Recent lawsuits filed by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and the Attorneys General of the states of Washington and Illinois allege that Navient, the nation’s largest servicer of student loans, used illegal and deceptive practices to trap students into higher repayment plans for longer periods of time than necessary. Navient denies any wrongdoing.

The most serious allegation is that, from January 2010 to March 2015, Navient based employee compensation in part on manipulating student borrowers into postponing payments through forbearance which cost students an extra $4 billion in unnecessary fees. In another example, Navient is accused of shouldering disabled veterans with poor credit reports due to improperly marking their loan discharges as defaults.

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THE FATE OF THE FIDUCIARY RULE

By: Cara Van Dorn*| Staff Writer

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The Trump administration and a republican Congress have begun efforts to unravel the Department of Labor’s six-year-long effort to ensure that Americans saving for retirement receive only investment advice that is in their best interest.  The Fiduciary Rule, unpopular with conservatives and some members of the investment advice industry since its inception, was promulgated in response to a study by the White House’s Council of Economic Advisors that found that American workers lose more than $17 billion each year to conflicted investment advice.   Continue reading »

The Business of the Oscars

By: Jacky Brammer*| Staff Writer

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By BDS2006 (talk) – I created this work entirely by myself., CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8109739

The Academy Awards for the film and entertainment industry are Sunday, February 26, and after La La Land netted a record-tying 14 nominations in mid-January, its win for Best Picture seems inevitable. But La La Land has just as many fans as it does detractors. The detractors have many axes to grind but a common criticism is that a La La Land victory will perpetuate a larger, engrained problem: The Declining Business of the Oscars. Continue reading »

FinTech Disruptor, Blockchain, Makes Its First Splash on Wall Street

By: Thomas Gaffney*| Staff Writer

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On Monday January 9th,  the Depository Trust and Clearing Corporation (DTCC), which plays a major role in recording and reporting nearly every stock and bond trade in the United States, announced that it is replacing one of its central databases with a new blockchain style software inspired by the technology underlying the cryptocurrency Bitcoin.  Bitcoin is the World’s most popular cryptocurrency and was the originator of the new financial technology disruptor Blockchain.  The concept of Blockchain is essentially a “revolutionary approach to the age-old problem of trust.”  Blockchain is a decentralized network that produces a public ledger by recording transactions conducted on the network which are then verified by third parties. Because of its design, Blockchain cannot be changed or modified unilaterally, and therefore any changes made to the ledger need to be accepted by the entire network making it more reliable and secure than contemporary methods.
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