COVID-19

Chaos is Not a Pit. It is a Ladder.

By: R. Daniel Johnson

amazon (2)

There is no question that the Coronavirus pandemic has and will continue to drastically alter the business world. Even in this uncertainty, some companies are experiencing more confidence and profits than ever before. Amazon has gained over $570 Billion in market capitalization this year. Its stock has risen 63.3 percent and is now trading for $3,000 a share. Clorox has experienced organic sales growth of over 24 percent. Peloton reported revenue growth of 77 percent. But these success stories are few and far between as CNBC has reported that over 7.5 Million companies are at risk of closing their doors every day. Despite the looming closure that many companies are facing due to the pandemic, some companies have thrived. The massive success of these companies have led many to fear monopolization and antitrust issues.

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The Legal Implications of 3D Printing in the Fight Against COVID-19

By: Alyssa Valdes

3D Print of a SARS-CoV-2

3D print of a SARS-CoV-2 virus particle

 

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, medical equipment and other essentials have run out of supply, paving the way for 3D printing to alleviate these supply shortages. The increased need for certain products, such as masks, face shields, and ventilator valves, has led to a gap in supply and demand. Owners of 3D printing technology have stepped in to produce more of these products and prevent further spread of COVID-19, but their acts of kindness come with some potential risks.

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COVID-19, Compulsory Licensing, and the Battle Between Health and Economy

By: John Stevelinck, Jr.

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At present, there have been over 2.5 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 and over 100,000 COVID-19 related deaths in the United States. As a result, efforts to develop a vaccine are in full swing, placing the U.S. Government in a unique situation when it comes to patent rights.

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Pandemic Playbook: What Games Without Fans Means for Financing Football

By: Ashley Willard

https://pixabay.com/photos/stadium-rows-of-seats-grandstand-2921657/

https://pixabay.com/photos/stadium-rows-of-seats-grandstand-2921657/

In March, after a long year of negotiations with the NFL, the NFL Players Association (“NFLPA”) ratified the 2020 Collective Bargaining Agreement (“CBA”), which governs through 2030. Neither side could have anticipated that a pandemic would ravage the country and potentially bring them back to the bargaining table just months later. Since the NFL does not have a “force majeure” clause in its CBA that could terminate the season, the show must go on. However, the NFL and the NFLPA will need to work together to address both safety issues and the looming prospect of a shrinking salary cap in 2021. Continue reading »

College Football in 2020: The NCAA’s No-Good-Alternatives Dilemma

By: Kyle Tatich

https://pixabay.com/photos/football-american-college-83513/

https://pixabay.com/photos/football-american-college-83513/

When it comes to the decisions to suspend, amend, or fully continue fall sports in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, the echoes of history are too loud for the NCAA and its member schools to ignore. Those who advocate for games to happen are not only tossing aside the final vestiges of the NCAA’s founding purpose—enhancing the safety of college sports—but also possibly tearing down many protections collegiate athletics has earned in the court of law over the past 70 years. Continue reading »