COVID-19

“TRIP-ing” Backward: Why a Waiver of IP Protections Will Not Help in the Fight Against COVID-19

By: Benjamin Suslavich

One year ago, the Wake Forest Journal of Business & Intellectual Property Law addressed the prospect of compulsory licensing under the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (“TRIPS Agreement“). The TRIPS Agreement is an international treaty that came into effect in 1995 and sets out minimum standards of intellectual property (“IP”) protection each signatory country must uphold. Continue reading »

The Safety of an Employee’s Personal Information: A Look at Data Privacy Concerns

By: Lashania White

Data privacy concerns have undoubtedly spiked during the pandemic due to new categories of identifiable personal data being collected from employees. Given this rise in accumulated personal information, data privacy law has the potential to be implicated, owing to the collection and disclosure of employees’ confidential personal information. Continue reading »

Diagnosing the Future of Telemedicine: COVID-19-Motivated Regulation Changes Should be Permanently Adopted

By: Joey Johnson

COVID-19 turned the world on its head. As the world came to a screeching halt, healthcare providers and essential businesses were tasked with maintaining function while protecting patients, employees, and customers amidst a rapidly changing health and technological landscape. Telemedicine quickly emerged as a tool to connect patients and healthcare providers without the risks of in-person interaction. Continue reading »

Mandatory Patent Waivers: A Debate Gone Viral

By: Carli Berasi

Vaccine

A conversation regarding patent rights has entered the international pharmaceutical stage as the World Trade Organization has debated requiring a temporary waiver of patent protections granted to companies for their COVID-19 vaccines. Continue reading »

Motivating, Momentous, Masterful: What Businesses Can Learn from 3M in Light of the COVID-19 Pandemic

By: Katherine Brock 

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At the start of the twentieth century, five men founded the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company for the purpose of mining for corundum, an extremely hard and versatile mineral ideal for making sandpaper and grinding wheels. The company failed, however, discovering only a low-grade, inferior mineral called anorthosite. Today, with corporate operations in seventy countries and sales in two hundred countries, the same company is a household name across several industries, including automotive, electronics, energy, healthcare, manufacturing, safety, and transportation, among many others. Most recently, the company served as a leading global provider of personal protective equipment (“PPE”) throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. This is 3M. Continue reading »

Better Fortune in the New Year? The NCAA’s Fate Depends on [March] Madness

By: Kyle Tatich

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Future historians and scholars will not lack substance when writing about 2020: the year dominated by the COVID-19 pandemic, a wave of protests against racial injustice, and a complete alteration to the American way of life. Similarly, in the realm of collegiate athletics, the year 2020 will amount to a significance of equal magnitude as it epitomized the most transformative year in the 114-year history of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (“NCAA”). Unfortunately for the NCAA, the challenges of 2020 will roll over into the new year, and the governing body’s viability will be tested in the first few months of 2021 as it attempts to conduct its lucrative men’s basketball tournament. Continue reading »

Protecting our Fingerprints and Retinas: A Call for Biometric Data Privacy Legislation

By: Mona Ibadi

Biometric Data

Covid-19 triggered a new normal that forced us into a virtual nation – one where we must rely on virtual mediums to connect with others. The ability of Americans to move online at such a rapid pace demonstrates the adaptability of our society. However, reliance on computers and technology raises several privacy and security concerns that need to be addressed. This begs the question: Is American legislation as adaptable to the new age of remote work as its people? Continue reading »

Chaos is Not a Pit. It is a Ladder.

By: R. Daniel Johnson

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There is no question that the Coronavirus pandemic has and will continue to drastically alter the business world. Even in this uncertainty, some companies are experiencing more confidence and profits than ever before. Amazon has gained over $570 Billion in market capitalization this year. Its stock has risen 63.3 percent and is now trading for $3,000 a share. Clorox has experienced organic sales growth of over 24 percent. Peloton reported revenue growth of 77 percent. But these success stories are few and far between as CNBC has reported that over 7.5 Million companies are at risk of closing their doors every day. Despite the looming closure that many companies are facing due to the pandemic, some companies have thrived. The massive success of these companies have led many to fear monopolization and antitrust issues.

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The Legal Implications of 3D Printing in the Fight Against COVID-19

By: Alyssa Valdes

3D Print of a SARS-CoV-2

3D print of a SARS-CoV-2 virus particle

 

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, medical equipment and other essentials have run out of supply, paving the way for 3D printing to alleviate these supply shortages. The increased need for certain products, such as masks, face shields, and ventilator valves, has led to a gap in supply and demand. Owners of 3D printing technology have stepped in to produce more of these products and prevent further spread of COVID-19, but their acts of kindness come with some potential risks.

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COVID-19, Compulsory Licensing, and the Battle Between Health and Economy

By: John Stevelinck, Jr.

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At present, there have been over 2.5 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 and over 100,000 COVID-19 related deaths in the United States. As a result, efforts to develop a vaccine are in full swing, placing the U.S. Government in a unique situation when it comes to patent rights.

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