Health Care

“TRIP-ing” Backward: Why a Waiver of IP Protections Will Not Help in the Fight Against COVID-19

By: Benjamin Suslavich

One year ago, the Wake Forest Journal of Business & Intellectual Property Law addressed the prospect of compulsory licensing under the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (“TRIPS Agreement“). The TRIPS Agreement is an international treaty that came into effect in 1995 and sets out minimum standards of intellectual property (“IP”) protection each signatory country must uphold. Continue reading »

Diagnosing the Future of Telemedicine: COVID-19-Motivated Regulation Changes Should be Permanently Adopted

By: Joey Johnson

COVID-19 turned the world on its head. As the world came to a screeching halt, healthcare providers and essential businesses were tasked with maintaining function while protecting patients, employees, and customers amidst a rapidly changing health and technological landscape. Telemedicine quickly emerged as a tool to connect patients and healthcare providers without the risks of in-person interaction. Continue reading »

Mandatory Patent Waivers: A Debate Gone Viral

By: Carli Berasi

Vaccine

A conversation regarding patent rights has entered the international pharmaceutical stage as the World Trade Organization has debated requiring a temporary waiver of patent protections granted to companies for their COVID-19 vaccines. Continue reading »

Tokyo Olympics: Japan’s No-Good-Alternatives Dilemma

By: Hannah Norem

Olympic Rings

After a year-long delay, the 2020—now 2021—Tokyo Olympic Games will begin July 23. However, these Games are incredibly unpopular in Japan, the host nation, and raise public health questions around the world. COVID-19 is still ravaging many parts of the world, and some are concerned about the safety of bringing thousands of athletes together and then sending them back to their home countries.

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Se[a]ttle for Better: Learning About Health Outcomes from the City that Sparked the Higher Minimum Wage Movement

By: Katherine Brock 

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Nearly eight years ago, fast food employees in Seattle marched out of work and into the streets, launching a strike—and ultimately a movement—for a $15 minimum wage. Within two months, the strike spread to more than fifty cities across the country, forcing many restaurants to close temporarily amid cries for higher wages and the right to organize. Today, Seattle residents enjoy a minimum wage between $15 and $16.69 an hour depending on the size of the employer, but the movement that spurred change in Seattle—and even the state of Washington—has yet to succeed on a national scale. Why is that? Continue reading »

Up In Smoke: How Vaping Regulations and Bans May Detriment Small Businesses

By: Nathaniel Reiff

Once considered a healthier alternative to traditional cigarette smoking, vaping might be burning out in the United States. Recently, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker ordered a four-month ban on the sale of vaping products after declaring a statewide public health emergency. Governor Baker’s decision comes after 61 cases of lung disease, purportedly related to electronic cigarettes and vaping use, were reported in his state alone. According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), since September 17, there have been 530 cases of lung injuries across 38 states. The CDC has not identified any one company or vaping product as responsible for the deaths and injuries associated with the growing trend of alternative cigarette use. According to the New York Times, “Many of the illnesses have been linked to vaping mixtures with THC, the high-inducing chemical in marijuana.”

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Uh Oh, Opioids!

By: Mary Jasperse, Summer Blogger

Branded Oxycodone 10mg

In 2017, The New Yorker published an expose on the Sackler Family and their company, Purdue Pharma, that blew the top off of a modern American scandal. This entrepreneurial family became one of the wealthiest in America, amassing a net worth of over thirteen billion dollars in a matter of years. The key to their success has been OxyContin, an oxycodone pain medication chemically similar to morphine. Though no more effective than similar products, OxyContin became the brand leader through aggressive marketing and promotion from Purdue Pharma. As a result of this vigorous campaigning, annual prescriptions for OxyContin increased from 600,000 thousand to 6 million.

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AbbVie Wins U.S. Trial in Lawsuit Over AndroGel’s Risks

By: Andrew Homer *| Staff Writer

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One out of four middle-aged men over 30 years of age suffer from low testosterone levels (“Low T”). The number of middle-aged men who are prescribed hormone treatment to increase testosterone levels have ballooned since 2001 and began to deflate after 2013.

This rise in Low T treatment might be due to the marketing strategies of the manufacturers of these hormone treatments. Or at least, that is one of the arguments made by the plaintiff in a case recently decided in Notle v. AbbVie, Inc., et al.

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Spring 2018 Symposium: Intellectual Property & Medical Technology: From Creation to Commercialization

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The Wake Forest Journal of Business and Intellectual Property Law present its Spring Symposium:

Intellectual Property and Medical Technology: From Creation to Commercialization 

The Symposium is being held, today, Friday, February 2, 2018, from 8:30 am – 4:00 pm at the Wake Forest Innovation Quarter (Biotech Place). This year’s event will look at medical patents, bioethics and the intellectual property implications of medical technology.

MORNING SESSION

Overview of Regenerative Medicine, Role of Law, & Bioethics

Keynote Speakers: Julie Watson and Dr. John D. Jackson

Julie Watson, Chief Legal Counsel for the Institute for Regenerative Medicine at the Wake Forest School of Medicine, opened the Wake Forest Journal of Business and Intellectual Property Law Symposium by introducing the first speaker of the day, Dr. John D. Jackson. Dr. Jackson, an associate professor at the Institute since 2010, began the day’s events by explaining the technical components of the Institute.

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A General Overview of the Journal of Business and Intellectual Property Law’s Symposium: “Intellectual Property and Medical Technology: From Creation to Commercialization”

By Justfixingawrongnumber (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

By Justfixingawrongnumber (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

The Wake Forest Journal of Business and Intellectual Property Law will be hosting its spring symposium,  “Intellectual Property and Medical Technology: From Creation to Commercialization,” beginning at 8:30 a.m. this Friday, February 2, 2018, in the Wake Forest Biotech Place Atrium at Wake Forest Innovation Quarter. Medical patents, the intersection of bioethics and the law, and the venture capitalist-side of regenerative medicine are among some of the topics to be discussed at this year’s symposium. This blog post is meant to provide a brief overview of bioethics and venture capitalists of medical devices.

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