Intellectual Property

Are Humans Ready? Is the Law Equipped to Handle Artificial Intelligence?

By: Ben Suslavich

In 2015, DeepMind, owned by Alphabet, developed Artificial Intelligence (“AI”) AlphaGo to beat the reigning three-time European Champion, Fan Hui, in the board game “Go.” This victory marked a milestone in the development of AI because of the complexity of the game. Continue reading »

Get Your Chip Together: The Role of Patent Protection in the Global Chip Shortage

By: Ryan Mahabir

Have you noticed a shortage of Ford and Toyota vehicles? Have you had trouble finding a new washing machine? Are you wondering if you will ever get your hands on a PlayStation 5? You are likely not alone in having these thoughts. All of the aforementioned products require semiconductor chips for their electrical components to function properly and to “provide a variety of functions ranging from computing to storage and memory.” Continue reading »

Preventing Trademark Infringement or Stifling Healthy Competition? A Look at 1-800 Contacts and its Keyword Advertising Battle

By: Michaela Cappucci 

Do keyword search terms promote or stifle healthy competition? It is difficult to remember a time when keyword advertising did not dominate the internet. Most search engines, such as Google, Bing, and Yahoo, maintain keyword advertising programs which allow advertisers to bid on search terms and keywords that drive customers searching for a particular product or service to their website. Continue reading »

Olympics’ Copyright Issue Highlights the IOC’s Outdated IP Licensing Approach

By: Seth Elizondo

As the 2020 Tokyo Olympics concluded for the summer, a new copyright issue came to the forefront of entertainment law. Félix “xQc” Lengyel, one of the most popular content creators on the livestreaming platform Twitch, received a copyright strike under the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act (“DMCA”). Continue reading »

“TRIP-ing” Backward: Why a Waiver of IP Protections Will Not Help in the Fight Against COVID-19

By: Benjamin Suslavich

One year ago, the Wake Forest Journal of Business & Intellectual Property Law addressed the prospect of compulsory licensing under the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (“TRIPS Agreement“). The TRIPS Agreement is an international treaty that came into effect in 1995 and sets out minimum standards of intellectual property (“IP”) protection each signatory country must uphold. Continue reading »

Patents & Politics Don’t Mix: Why the Supreme Court’s Decision in Arthrex Fails to Fix an Underlying Problem

By: Benjamin Suslavich

In a split 5-4 decision in Arthrex Inc. v. Smith & Nephew, Inc, the Supreme Court determined that the structure of Administrative Patent Judge (“APJs”) appointments—or lack thereof—was unconstitutional and took it upon itself to restructure the Patent Office’s chain of command. This case is another example of the Court striving to preserve the inter partes review (IPR) system, which allows anyone to file a petition requesting that the Patent Office cancel another’s patent. Continue reading »

Mandatory Patent Waivers: A Debate Gone Viral

By: Carli Berasi

Vaccine

A conversation regarding patent rights has entered the international pharmaceutical stage as the World Trade Organization has debated requiring a temporary waiver of patent protections granted to companies for their COVID-19 vaccines. Continue reading »

When Theft Gets Political: Addressing China’s Corrupt IP Practices

By: Mona Ibadi

Blog #2 Photo

The United States spends billions of dollars making revolutionary strides in technological research every year. Businesses, big and small, are expending resources to provide up-to-date, innovative products to effectively compete in the market. Although technological development is rapidly growing, the concern for intellectual property theft remains an issue. Despite a lack of public concern, economic espionage from America’s leading culprit – the Chinese government – has increased by 1,300% in the past decade. Continue reading »

The Washington NFL Team’s Newest Opponent: The “Trademark Hog”

By: Kyle Tatich

Washington_Football_Team_logo (1)

Inspired by the 2014 South Park episode regarding the Washington Redskins and its trademark controversy, Virginia’s Philip Martin McCaulay began filing applications with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”), hopeful for a potential payday if a name change became necessary for the NFL’s franchise in Washington, D.C. That day came in July 2020, following a wave of anti-racist protests sparked by the death of George Floyd on May 25. The July announcement that Pro Football Inc. and majority owner Dan Snyder would move on from the 86-year-old nickname of “Redskins” launched McCaulay and his many trademark applications and registrations into the national spotlight.

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The Legal Implications of 3D Printing in the Fight Against COVID-19

By: Alyssa Valdes

3D Print of a SARS-CoV-2

3D print of a SARS-CoV-2 virus particle

 

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, medical equipment and other essentials have run out of supply, paving the way for 3D printing to alleviate these supply shortages. The increased need for certain products, such as masks, face shields, and ventilator valves, has led to a gap in supply and demand. Owners of 3D printing technology have stepped in to produce more of these products and prevent further spread of COVID-19, but their acts of kindness come with some potential risks.

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