Sports

Pandemic Playbook: What Games Without Fans Means for Financing Football

By: Ashley Willard

https://pixabay.com/photos/stadium-rows-of-seats-grandstand-2921657/

https://pixabay.com/photos/stadium-rows-of-seats-grandstand-2921657/

In March, after a long year of negotiations with the NFL, the NFL Players Association (“NFLPA”) ratified the 2020 Collective Bargaining Agreement (“CBA”), which governs through 2030. Neither side could have anticipated that a pandemic would ravage the country and potentially bring them back to the bargaining table just months later. Since the NFL does not have a “force majeure” clause in its CBA that could terminate the season, the show must go on. However, the NFL and the NFLPA will need to work together to address both safety issues and the looming prospect of a shrinking salary cap in 2021. Continue reading »

College Football in 2020: The NCAA’s No-Good-Alternatives Dilemma

By: Kyle Tatich

https://pixabay.com/photos/football-american-college-83513/

https://pixabay.com/photos/football-american-college-83513/

When it comes to the decisions to suspend, amend, or fully continue fall sports in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, the echoes of history are too loud for the NCAA and its member schools to ignore. Those who advocate for games to happen are not only tossing aside the final vestiges of the NCAA’s founding purpose—enhancing the safety of college sports—but also possibly tearing down many protections collegiate athletics has earned in the court of law over the past 70 years. Continue reading »

Symposium Feature Story: Balling on a Budget and Assessing the Federal Government’s Potential Role in Regulating College Athletics’ Compensation

By: Nathaniel Reiff

NCAA

The “eternal conflict” of athletic departments fostering a for-profit business model while adhering to the nonprofit educational mission of the NCAA and its umbrella of public universities has captured the interest of both federal and state lawmakers.

Up to 30 states are considering proposals that would lay the foundation for student-athlete compensation. This initiative comes after California passed a law in 2019 that would allow NCAA players in the state to make endorsements or bid merchandise without jeopardizing their scholarships or eligibility.

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Symposium Spotlight: Michael Grace Jr.

By: Olivia Bane

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Michael Grace Jr. will moderate the Athletes as Employees: Analyzing the Business Implications of the “Pay-for-Play” Model panel at the Wake Forest Journal of Business & Intellectual Property Law’s Spring 2020 symposium. Michael’s practice focuses on business and finance, securities, and mergers and acquisitions. He is a first-year associate in Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton’s Winston-Salem office. Prior to joining Kilpatrick Townsend, Michael spent several years as legal counsel at the Supreme Court of North Carolina, where he provided legal support to the Honorable Chief Justice Mark Martin in his role as head of the North Carolina Judicial Branch. Previously, Mr. Grace served as a Judicial Law Clerk for Chief Justice Martin.

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Symposium Spotlight: Mason Ashe

By: Brian Lewis

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Mason P. Ashe wears many hats. An experienced sports and entertainment attorney, talent manager, brand strategist, and educator, Mr. Ashe brings over 25 years of experience in the legal and business arenas to best serve his clients, community, and students. As Founder and CEO of Ashe Sports & Entertainment Consulting, Inc., Ashe has structured and negotiated deals related to athlete and entertainer engagement, executive compensation, digital content licensing, and many other agreements associated with the scouting, marketing, management, employment, and commercialization of talent in the sports and entertainment industries globally. Ashe earned a BA degree in Psychology from Hamilton College, and a Juris Doctor degree from the State University of New York at Buffalo Law School. ​

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Symposium Spotlight: Shelia Huggins

By: Olivia Bane

 

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Shelia Huggins is a solo practitioner, law professor, North Carolina representative for the Democratic National Committee, and social media personality. Shelia’s firm, Shelia Huggins, PLLC, focuses on business, contracts, sports, media, internet, employment, and entertainment law. Shelia teaches an Entertainment and Business Law course as an adjunct professor at North Carolina Central School of Law. For nearly nine years, Shelia also worked for the city of Durham, where she was involved in the programming of citywide events and projects supporting neighborhood revitalization efforts and economic development.

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