law

Symposium Spotlight: Professor Cat Moon

By: Samantha Moench

Professor Caitlin “Cat” Moon comes to us from Vanderbilt University School of Law and will be speaking on the Legal Design panel at our Spring Symposium: Lawyering in the Future: Impact of Technology on the Law

Professor Moon is scholar in the field of legal design. Her professional experience centers around bringing a “human-centered design perspective” into the legal profession. She serves as the Director of Innovation Designat Vanderbilt Law School. Professor Moon has developed an “interactive” curriculum to inspire innovation within the legal profession by focusing on helping lawyers and legal practitioners adapt to the rapid advance of both technology and design.

Vanderbilt actually has a special department called the Program on Law and Innovation, which is dedicated to informing both its students and the larger legal community about the impact the advancement of technology and design has had on the practice of law in America. Professor Moon serves as a Director of Vanderbilt’s Program on Law and Innovation Institute (PoLI), which is a smaller group under the umbrella of the larger PoLI program that goes out and teaches legal professionals and scholars about the importance of integrating technology into their law practices and studies. She also helped co-discover Vanderbilt’s Summit on Law and Innovation as a part of the program.  Continue reading »

Symposium Spotlight: Stephanie Jenkins

By: Melissa Lawrence

As technology advances, attorneys face unprecedented issues in ethics and professional responsibility. From advertising on social media to protecting client information from cyberattacks, attorneys of the future will need to understand how new technologies raise new ethical issues and how available software, applications, and other solutions can help them avoid both old and new legal ethical dilemmas.

Stephanie Jenkins, an ethics and compliance professional, will discuss new and developing technology and its impact on the legal profession at the Wake Forest Journal of Business and Intellectual Property’s Spring Symposium: Lawyering in the Future: Impact of Technology on the Law.

Ms. Jenkins has worked in the governance, risk, and compliance field for over twelve years. She has managed and built Ethics and Compliance programs for major companies such as the Gap and Premier Healthcare Alliance. Ms. Jenkins holds a Masters of Business Administration from Georgia State University’s Robinson College of Business, a Master of Arts in Professional and Applied Ethics, and a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. She is also a graduate from both The Ethics & Compliance Initiative’s Managing Ethics in an Organization Program and the Ethics & Compliance Officer Association’s Executive Development Program. Ms. Jenkins also served in the United States Marine Corps Reserves and the North Carolina Air National Guard.

Currently, Ms. Jenkins serves as Chief Compliance Officer at Ethix360,a company that provides businesses with innovative software for creating and implementing compliance programs. With Ethix360, Ms. Jenkins helps generate solutions for investigating and resolving compliance and ethical issues, minimizing negative impacts on company reputations, and managing reporting concerns and workplace investigations. Many of these solutions were developed with the legal field in mind.

Ms. Jenkins is scheduled to speak on the “Practice Management and Incorporated Technology” panel from 9:00 AM to 10:30 AM, in room 401 of the Benson Center on the WFU Main Campus.

Symposium Spotlight: Steve Lauer

By: Amber Razzano

Steve Lauer is a practicing attorney and a current adjunct professor at Wake Forest University School of Law. Lauer’s course is titled “Thinking Like an In-House Lawyer.” This course focuses on law firms that represent business entities must understand the needs and expectations of those entities in order to deliver a legal service that provides higher value to the business. Lauer has an extensive background in the corporate law environment. Lauer received a B.A. from the State University of New York at Buffalo and a J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Lauer has authored over 100 articles on topics relevant to corporate compliance and corporate legal service. Prior to becoming an in-house attorney, Lauer was in private practice for six years. He currently “consults with corporate compliance departments regarding the structure and operation of corporate compliance and ethics programs . . . and with law departments and law firms on the value of legal service.” Lauer has served over two years as Corporate Counsel for Global Compliance Services in Charlotte, North Carolina, improving the ability of business operations to comply with data protection rules in the European Union and other jurisdictions. Lauer also spent extensive time as an Assistant General Counsel for The Prudential Company of America increasing management of legal affairs in the real estate environment. Lauer’s panel at the Wake Forest Journal of Business and Intellectual Property’s Spring Symposium, Lawyering in the Future: Impact of Technology on the Law, will focus on developing legal software and technology’s impact on legal practices, client relations, and other similar issues.  Steve will be speaking on our first panel from 9:00 to 10:30 am. Continue reading »

The Conflict Between 3D Printing and Patent Law

By: Daniel Norton

zmorph-multitool-3d-printer-1221521-unsplashIn the past, science fiction books and television shows toyed with the idea of “replicators” and “matter compilers.” The idea was that people would be able to produce the tools or objects they needed in any given situation from the comforts of their own homes or starships. Mere decades after this idea was considered a fantasy it has become a reality as Americans have increasingly begun using 3D printers to create tools and objects they need from the comfort of their own homes. But the advent of 3D printers has not brought about the utopian freedoms things like Star Trek indicated. Instead, 3D printing technology has created entirely new challenges for the US patent system to grapple with.

The creation of an object using 3D printing is known as additive manufacturing. This process involves a 3D printer applying a given material in thin layers on top of each other to create an object dictated to it by a computer-aided design (CAD) file. While this ability was first created in the 1980s, it has exploded in popularity over the past few years due to the advent of “home” 3D printers. Continue reading »

“Believe Me!” Trump’s Twitter Habits Trigger a Fascinating First Amendment Fiasco

By: Jason Wiener, Summer Blogger

What’s the difference between blocking and muting someone on Twitter, and does it really matter? More importantly, who owns a social media profile? The users that create and run the page or the social media company that runs the platform?  Continue reading »