NIL

The Student-Athlete Equity Act of 2020: A Step in the Right Direction

By: Gabe Marx

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The sports world has gone head-to-head with the NCAA for over a decade, arguing that college athletes should be allowed to benefit fully for their on-field success in the form of compensation for their name, image, and likeness (“NIL”). Despite consistent pushback, both legal and societal, the battle for NIL compensation has been slow developing as the NCAA’s amateurism rules have long prevented athletes from receiving such compensation. In the past month, however, the five largest and most impactful NCAA athletic conferences known as “the Power 5” (Big 10, SEC, Big 12, Pac 12, and ACC) joined forces to produce a new piece of legislation entitled the “Student-Athlete Equity Act of 2020,” once again spurring the debate about the NIL rights of student-athletes.

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Symposium Feature Story: Balling on a Budget and Assessing the Federal Government’s Potential Role in Regulating College Athletics’ Compensation

By: Nathaniel Reiff

NCAA

The “eternal conflict” of athletic departments fostering a for-profit business model while adhering to the nonprofit educational mission of the NCAA and its umbrella of public universities has captured the interest of both federal and state lawmakers.

Up to 30 states are considering proposals that would lay the foundation for student-athlete compensation. This initiative comes after California passed a law in 2019 that would allow NCAA players in the state to make endorsements or bid merchandise without jeopardizing their scholarships or eligibility.

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